Monthly Archives: June 2010

Wild Dogs Commute

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Wild dogs that commute from suburbs to scavenge in city The clever canines board the Tube each morning. After a hard day scavenging and begging on the streets, they hop back on the train and return to the suburbs where they spend the night.

Experts studying the dogs say they even work together to make sure they get off at the right stop — after learning to judge the length of time they need to spend on the train. The mutts choose the quietest carriages at the front and back of the train. They have also developed tactics to hustle humans into giving them more food on the streets of Moscow.

Dr Poiarkov told how the dogs like to play during their daily commute. He said: “They jump on the train seconds before the doors shut, risking their tails getting jammed. They do it for fun. And sometimes they fall asleep and get off at the wrong stop.” The dogs have learned to use traffic lights to cross the road safely, said Dr Poiarkov. And they use cunning tactics to obtain tasty morsels of shawarma, a kebab-like snack popular in Moscow.

 

from Wild Dogs Take Chewbilee Line by Virginia Wheeler | The Sun

 

via 1 Nation | dern

 

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Brion Gysin: The Unknown Loved by the Knowns (NYT)

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The artist Brion Gysin with his Dreamachine.

By RANDY KENNEDY

from The Unknown Loved by the Knowns:

“IF you want to disappear … come around for private lessons,” the artist Brion Gysin once offered in a prose poem. And during a period in Paris in the late 1950s, when he and the novelist William S. Burroughs were experimenting with crystal balls, mirrors and other contraptions of the occult, a mutual friend swore that he saw Gysin exercise the powers of dematerialization, perhaps with help from the various narcotics that always seemed to be lying around for the taking.

“Brion disappeared before my eyes, for periods of 10 or 15 or 20 minutes,” the friend, Roger Knoebber, told an interviewer.

But during a ferociously productive, wildly eclectic career in painting, writing and performance that lasted half a century, it often seemed as if Gysin, who died in poverty in 1986, had too great a facility for disappearance, at least as far as his reputation in the art world was concerned.Despite a longing for recognition, he was generally known less for his own work than for his associations with a prodigious number of more famous artists for whom he was, by turns, a teacher, friend and all-around guru: Burroughs, Paul Bowles, Max Ernst, Alice B. Toklas, Keith HaringDavid Bowie and Iggy Pop, among others.

As death approached, Gysin feared that his peripatetic life had been only an adventure, “leading nowhere” except through a procession of illustrious homes like Tangier, the Chelsea Hotel in Manhattan and the poet’s bunkhouse in Paris known as the Beat Hotel,where he spent several of his most productive years. “You should hammer one nail all your life, and I didn’t do that,” he wrote in a lament cited by his biographer, John Geiger. “I hammered on a lot of nails like a xylophone.”

But now the New Museum of Contemporary Art has gathered the widely scattered pieces of Gysin’s strange, necromantic career and is working to haul him up from the underground once and for all with “Dream Machine,” the first retrospective of his art in the United States. The show, which opens July 7, will include more than 300 paintings, drawings, photo-collages and films, along with an original version of the Dreamachine, the spinning, light-emitting, trance-inducing kinetic sculpture that Gysin helped design with a computer programmer, Ian Sommerville, in 1960 that has become his most famous work. (The exhibition’s catalog includes a paper foldout and instructions to build your own Dreamachine, provided you can locate your old turntable.)

The show is the first devoted to a dead artist by the New Museum since it moved into its sleek new home on the Bowery in 2007. The institution’s programming there has generally reflected its name, showcasing recent art by those still working, many of them young. But Laura Hoptman, the museum’s senior curator and the organizer of the show, said the departure in Gysin’s case made perfect sense because his work remains largely unknown to the American public and his influence — the kind that eluded him during his lifetime — now seems to be everywhere in the contemporary art world.

“I knew about him, and then six or seven years ago it felt like I started hearing his name from everyone,” Ms. Hoptman said. “I kept trying to figure out all the ways they had arrived at Gysin.”

(Continue Reading  | via New York Times)

Brion Gysin

bio

via my film blog by Elizabeth Sheldon

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Symphony No. 4 (Columbia, 1965)

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via Project Thirty-Three

The album covers featured on Project Thirty-Three were collected, scanned and archived by Jive Time Records, a Seattle based store specializing in used vinyl.

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Project Thirty-Three: Your Keys To Success (Olivetti, 1968)

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Uncredited design for Olivetti Underwood typewriter course on LP.

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Tone Poems of Color

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Frank Sinatra Conducts Tone Poems of Color is a 1956 album of tone poems composed by eight notable mid-20th century Hollywood arrangers, with each composition inspired by the poetry of Norman Sickel.

 

Design by Saul Bass

 

via Project Thirty Three

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Donald Byrd – Fuego

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Personnel: Donald Byrd (tp); Jackie McLean (as); Duke Pearson (p); Doug Watkins (b); Lex Humphries (ds).

Recorded on October 4th, 1959 at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

 

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POEM BY MAN RAY

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Man Ray: “–– –– –––––”

In: Francis Picabia (ed.): 391,

# 17 (June 1924), p. 3.”

also via:

http://walter-benjamin-bluemchen.tumblr.com

http://ratak-monodosico.tumblr.com

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The Whiskey A Go Go Scene from Faces

From the incredibly well done Cassavetes box set “Five Films” by Criterion. Simply beautiful film making. I love how he edited this scene. The absence of dialogue, the perfect cut of the eyes locking for an instance and the music filtering internally to lock in the moment.

found at thegrassyknoll | more

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poetry is

by George Quasha

61 POETS IN VOL. I:

Ammiel Alcalay, Hector Alves, David Antin, Arman, Coleman Barks, Caroline Bergvall, Charles Bernstein, Mei-Mei Berssenbrugge, Harvey Bialy, Blue, Lee Ann Brown, Tisa Bryant, Elizabeth Clark, Michael Coffey, Alan Davies, Michel Deguy, Timotha Doane, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Fisher, Joanna Fuhrman, Eric Gansworth, Steven Goodman, Carla Harryman, Kevin Hart, David Henderson, Mitch Highfill, Bob Holman, Anselm Hollo, Mikhail Horowitz, Fanny Howe, Susan Howe, Romana Huk, Franz Kamin, Robert Kelly, Richard Kostelanetz, Louise Landes Levi, Judith Malina, Chris Mann, Michael Meade, Joyce Carol Oates, Sharon Olds, Cheryl Pallant, Nick Piombino, Kristen Prevallet, India Radfar, Carter Ratcliff, Hanon Reznikov, Jerome Rothenberg, Sapphire, Leslie Scalapino, Ron Silliman, Charles Stein, David Levi Strauss, Kate Suddes, Chris Tysh, Cecilia Vicuña, Tenzin Wangyal, Barrett Watten, Henry Weinfield, Elizabeth Willis, Krzysztof Ziarek

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