Daily Archives: January 12, 2011

The Codex Seraphinianus

The disturbing implication of this last page, and of every page of the Codex Seraphinianus, is that the real as we see it cannot contain everything. 

Other possibilities are continually generated by the imagination , and generated above all in images. Perhaps it is not as important as we thought to determine whether the images generatedare those of the artist, the dreamer, the fantasist or the hallucinator; for these species belong to one genus.

Codex Seraphinianus:  Hallucinatory Encyclopedia” – Peter Schwenger  

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The Codex Seraphinianus was written and illustrated by Italian graphic designer and architect, Luigi Serafini during the late 1970’s.

The Codex is a lavishly produced book that purports to be an encyclopedia for an imaginary world in a parallel universe, with copious comments in an incomprehensible language. It is written in a florid script, entirely invented and completely illegible, and illustrated with watercolor paintings. The Codex is divided into a number of sections (each with its own table of contents, the page numbers are in base-21 or base-22!) on subjects such as plants, animals, inhabitants, machines, clothing, architecture, numbers, cards, chemical analyses, labyrinth, Babel, foods… There are panoramic scenes of incomprehensible festivals, and diagrams of plumbing.

The Codex is to that imaginary world what Diderot’s Encyclopedia is to ours. Obviously, Serafini was not just attempting to create a consistent alternate world. Rather, the Codex is sort of an elaborate parody of the real world.

The invented script of the book imitates the Western-style writing systems (left-to-right writing in rows; an alphabet with uppercase and lowercase; probably a separate set of symbols for writing numerals) but is much more curvilinear reminding some Semitic scripts. The writing seems to have been designed to appear, but not actually be, meaningful, like the Voynich Manuscript.

via bright stupid confetti

Flickr:  Codex Seraphinianus photo set by Mavra Chang

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Girl Boss Blues: Queen Bee’s Counterattack (1971)

Sukeban Burusu: Mesubachi no Gyakushu (1971)

The opening to director Norifumi Suzuki’s film.

via PeaDeeN1

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Fluorescent Minerals Collection at University of Richmond

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These fluorescent specimens display the variety of colors under shortwave ultraviolet light. Calcite will fluoresce red, willemite fluoresces green, while franklinite does not fluoresce. © Lora Robins Gallery of Design from Nature, University of Richmond Museums. Photograph by Katherine Wetzel.

RICHMOND, VA.- The Lora Robins Gallery of Design from Nature, one of the University of Richmond Museums, will open the reinstallation of the permanent exhibition Fluorescent Minerals: From the Permanent Collection on January 12, 2011. This new display contains more than 300 specimens and more than 40 different mineral species from North America and beyond, and it explores the science behind these minerals’ ability to fluoresce. Highlights of the installation include numerous bright reddish-orange and green rocks of calcite and willemite from New Jersey, yellow-green hyalite opal slabs from North Carolina, and deep red rubies from India. 

A majority of these specimens originate from the famous Franklin-Sterling Hill mining district in Sussex County, New Jersey. These mines boast a world-record variety of minerals with more than 340 named species, and more than 80 fluorescent mineral types found in the area. Examples of minerals from this quarry that are featured in the collection are willemite, wollastonite, calcite, and hardystonite. 

What makes a rock fluoresce? When atoms within a mineral are exposed to ultraviolet light, they are filled with energy and become unstable. The atoms then eject this newly acquired energy and return to a more stable state. However, instead of ejecting this energy as ultraviolet light, the atoms eject it as light, or color. This light is responsible for the “glowing” colors emitted by the fluorescent minerals. 

Within the new installation, a push of a button turns on 28 new ultraviolet shortwave and longwave lamps that agitate the minerals’ internal atomic structure, causing the rocks to fluoresce brightly. Since the minerals glow differently under the two different wavelengths of ultraviolet light, the lamps run on a timed sequence that exposes the specimens first to longwave ultraviolet light, then shortwave ultraviolet light, and finally both long and shortwave light together to produce a unique and dazzling color show. 

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via artdaily

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