Monthly Archives: August 2011

Howl by Natalie Bettelheim

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“Howl” is Natalie Bettelheim & Sharon Michaeli’s graduation film from Bezalel academy of art and design.

Direction, design and compositing: Natalie Bettelheim
Animation: Sharon Michaeli
Sound design & music: Yoav Brill

projecthowl.blogspot.com

 

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Pivots

via jc hernandez

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In the Wave by Walter Russell

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Outsider scientific-mystic Walter Russell developed a lifelong philosophy based on the unifying principles of forces within the cosmos – what seems like a kind of pseudo-scientifically framed offshoot of non-dualism. The most interesting elements his work are the diagrams and charts illustrating his books. They document an idiosyncratic understanding of natural phenomena such as light, magnetism, thermodynamics, waves and vibration.

Esa Ruoho has collected together many illustrations from Russell’s key works in Flickr sets – images from the books The Secret of Light, The Universal One and Atomic Suicide. The ‘In the Wave’ set contains charts with painted colour spectra and elliptical prismatic shapes denoting light waves, electrical vibrations and magnetism.

A strong theme running through Russell’s schematics, especially evident in his ‘Home Study Course’ is the correspondences of geometric equivalences and orders. The charts resemble sets of musical scales, denoting frameworks of periodicity and harmony within particular natural systems. Many of the diagrams, at first glance, might easily be be misinterpreted as modern musical notation…

…It might just be the case that Walter Russell’s genius, and his diagrams, can only be decoded at a later moment in time. His friend Nikola Tesla had advised him to lock away his work in a safe for 1000 years – because humankind was not yet mature enough for it.

Diagrams and paintings by “outsider scientific-mystic” Walter Russell 

via The secret of creation lies in the wave | but does it float + data is nature

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The DIY Film Animation Show with Terry Gilliam

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Terry Gilliam, the legendary Monty Python animator, explains the secrets of the Monty Python cutout animations.

“Monty Python animator Terry Gilliam discussing his animation techniques on Bob Godfrey’s Do-It-Yourself Animation Show in 1974. Godfrey’s show, which made animation accessible to the masses by taking the mystery out of the production process, was vastly influential and inspired an entire generation of kids in England, including Nick Park, who created Wallace & Gromit, Jan Pinkava, who directed the Pixar short Geri’s Game, and Richard Bazley, an animator on Pocahontas, Hercules, and The Iron Giant. In a day and age when more kids are interested in animating than ever before, it’s a shame that TV shows (or Web series) that are fun and informative like this don’t exist. The DIY advice that Gilliam gives in this episode is not only brilliant, but still as relevant today as back then:
“The whole point of animation to me is to tell a story, make a joke, express an idea. The technique itself doesn’t really matter. Whatever works is the thing to use.”

Gilliam started out his career as an animator, then moved to England and joined up with Monty Python’s Flying Circus. For years, he worked as the group’s animator, creating the opening credits and distinctive buffers that linked together the offbeat comedy sketches.

via Terry Gilliam | The Monty Python Museum | Open Culture | Cartoonbrew

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Babelcast: Critical Intelligence Gap

Babel

The babelcast-mosaic is an algorithmic, computer-generated podcast series created from fragmented and distorted sounds of U.S. and World leaders. Juxtaposed and mixed with dynamic noise textures, the resulting ambient soundscape offers a unique musical perspective on mass media, language, and current events. This enhanced version adds algorithmically selected and manipulated still images. Each edition is built exclusively from sounds and images harvested within a defined period of days.

by Christopher Ariza 

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Critical Gap In In telligence:  

It depends on what your definition of Isis...

Marduk, Murdak, Murdoch

Etemenanki (Sumerian: “temple of the foundation of heaven and earth”) was the name of a ziggurat dedicated to Marduk in the city of Babylon. It was famously rebuilt by the 6th century BC Neo-Babylonian dynasty rulers Nabopolassar and Nebuchadnezzar II. According to modern scholars such as Stephen L. Harris, the biblical story of the Tower of Babel was likely influenced by Etemenanki during the Babylonian captivity of the Hebrews.

Nebuchadnezzar wrote that the original tower had been built in antiquity: “A former king built the Temple of the Seven Lights of the Earth, but he did not complete its head. Since a remote time, people had abandoned it, without order expressing their words. Since that time earthquakes and lightning had dispersed its sun-dried clay; the bricks of the casing had split, and the earth of the interior had been scattered in heaps.”

The Greek historian Herodotus (440 BC) later wrote of this ziggurat, which he called the “Temple of Zeus Belus”, giving an account of its vast dimensions.

The already decayed Great Ziggurat of Babylon was finally destroyed by Alexander the Great in an attempt to rebuild it. He managed to move the tiles of the tower to another location, but his death stopped the reconstruction. Since then only the base remains, but it is visible from Google Earth, which places its location at 32.5362583°N 44.4208252°E just south of Baghdad.

 

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Eric Dolphy Quintet (1961)

1961 30 August

Dolphy Quintet – 245

Berlin broadcast

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