Tag Archives: philosophy

Beautiful David Lynch

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July 21, 2012

Adam Bordow | AT HIS PEAK | David Lynch

THOUGH HE’S OFTEN assumed to be as peculiar as the creepy characters his movies feature, in person director David Lynch seems to have less in common with the Pabst-swilling sadist Frank Booth in “Blue Velvet,” and more with do-gooder Special Agent Dale Cooper, portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in “Twin Peaks.”

For starters, despite his proclivity for the outer limits, there’s no place like home for the Missoula, Mont.-born maker of such profane films as “Mulholland Drive” and “Lost Highway” and humane ones as “The Straight Story” and “The Elephant Man.”

“What I really like is to be at home, working,” he said one recent sundown from the penthouse suite of the Chateau Marmont hotel in Los Angeles, near the residence he shares with his

The homebody element had been evident the evening before at Hollywood’s labyrinthine Milk Studios. Guests were feting the 66-year-old filmmaker and painter for the debut of his collaboration with Dom Pérignon—he designed a signature look for a limited-edition run of vintage bottles. Mr. Lynch looked like a deer in the headlights, his grayish-blue eyes wary below his camera-friendly pompadour.

Even though 2001’s “Mulholland Drive” stuck a star on then-newbie Naomi Watts’s forehead, and earned Mr. Lynch his third Oscar nomination for best director, he has made only one feature-length movie since: 2006’s “Inland Empire.” In the meantime, he has focused on other passions—of which there are many.

Mr. Lynch embraced transcendental meditation around the time he made the 1977 curiosity “Eraserhead,” and since 2005 has headed the David Lynch Foundation, a charity he created to fund the teaching of T.M. in schools. It’s become a consuming mission.

He also has written a self-help memoir, “Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness, and Creativity”; conceptualized and designed furnishings for a Paris nightclub-arts space called Silencio (named after the fright-house theater in “Mulholland Drive”); and released a solo CD, entitled “Crazy Clown Time.” He and his wife are expecting a baby, who will be his fourth

Colleague Mel Brooks once called him “Jimmy Stewart from Mars.” But despite his dark reputation, the former Eagle Scout is sincere, folksy and ha-ha funny. He uses the word “beautiful” to describe nearly everything.

~.~

The greatest thing my father left me was a love for cutting wood, my love for sawing, especially

The most delicious food is far and away super-crisp, almost snapping-crisp bacon with two scrambled eggs, toasted hash browns, white toast with butter and jam, and coffee.

I have a coffee brand. But I’m not a businessman and I think my line of coffee will die the death this year. It’s very hard to make a profit.

I have deep love for my Swatch watch.

I can’t live without coffee, transcendental meditation, American Spirit cigarettes, a freedom to create ideas that flow and my sweet wife, Emily. And this business of just being able to work and think: It’s really, really beautiful.

You don’t need a special place to meditate. You can transcend anywhere in the world. The unified field is here, and there, and everywhere. Maybe if you sat on a bed of nails to do it…no, not so much comfort. Find a comfy chair, though, close your eyes and away you go!

I don’t paint the town red. But when I do go out, people always want to touch my hair. It happens

I first started buttoning my shirt [all the way to the top] because, for some reason, my collarbone is very sensitive. And I don’t like to feel wind on my

The best cities of all are Los Angeles and Paris. They’re where I feel most comfortable.

Martino/Vintage Los Angeles The Fish Shanty

I used to deliver The Wall Street Journal in Los Angeles. I did it to support myself while making “Eraserhead.” I’d pick up my papers at 11:30 at night. I had throws that were particularly fantastic. There was one where I’d release the paper, which would soar with the speed of the car and slam into the front door of this building, triggering its lobby lights—a fantastic experience. Another one I called “The Big Whale.” There was a place, the Fish Shanty, on La Cienega. A big whale’s mouth was the front door you entered through. I’d throw a block before it, and hit the paper directly into the mouth.

Martin Ramin for The Wall Street Journal (wine) From left: a Swatch watch, Mr. Lynch’s book and one of his designs for Dom Pérignon

One designer I love is [the late] Raymond Loewy. He redesigned the Coca-Cola bottle that stuck, designed the 1963 Avanti Studebaker…and his locomotives were incredibly beautiful.

I am currently working on some paintings and music. I am also trying to catch ideas for my next feature film. But I haven’t caught the right ones

My advice to finger-painters would be to go with your intuition: it’s action and reaction. I paint with my fingers quite a bit. A brush will do a certain thing…but your finger will do a different thing.

Collection An ‘Eraserhead’ poster

I recently collected a toy telephone. It’s from the 1940s and made of metal.

People say my films are dark. But like lightness, darkness stems from a reflection of the world. The thing is, I get these ideas that I truly fall in love with. And a good movie idea is often like a girl you’re in love with, but you know she’s not the kind of girl you bring home to your parents, because they sometimes hold some dark and troubling things.

Edited from an interview by Steve Garbarino

via The Wall Street Journal

http://on.wsj.com/Qdgh2A

Thank ya, Mark Parker + Roger Ebert @ebertchicago

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Bill Hicks – It’s Just a Ride (Kinetic Typography)

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Everything Is A Remix: THE MATRIX

EVERYTHINGISAREMIX.INFO

ROBGWILSON.COM

EDITED BY Robert Grigsby Wilson

PRODUCED BY Kirby Ferguson and Robert Grigsby Wilson

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I define the power elite as myself and my friends

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Coldcut’s tribute to Robert Anton Wilson. Part of the Royal Festival Hall’s Ether Festival (by Dancing Fish)

Robert Anton Wilson

RAW Poetry

Midnight Haiku

Mottled blueblack sky.
A sudden moon — briefly! Then:
Blueblack mottled sky…

Robert Anton Wilson (born Robert Edward Wilson, January 18, 1932 January 11, 2007), the American author of 33 influential books, became, at various times, a novelist, philosopher, essayist, editor, playwright, futurist, libertarian and self-described agnostic mystic.

Wilson described his work as an “attempt to break down conditioned associations, to look at the world in a new way, with many models recognized as models or maps, and no one model elevated to the truth”. His goal being “to try to get people into a state of generalized agnosticism, not agnosticism about God alone but agnosticism about everything.  Bob said Model Agnosticiam consists of never regarding any model or map of the universe with total 100% belief or total 100% denial. Bob’s Maybe Logic inspired the creation of the Maybe Logic Academy. Once when asked if he saw himself as a philosopher, he replied, “I am more of a speculator.”

Raw

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Signals from the DEW Line: Art & Poetry in the Global Village

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Signals from the DEW Line: Art and Poetry in the Global Village

Dates: November 8-13, 2011
Location: 2nd Floor Gallery, Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen Street West, Toronto
Opening Reception & Poetry Performances: Tuesday November 8, 7-10pm
Admission: Free

Mcluhan-poscardevite

“Art at its most significant is a distant early warning system that can always be relied on to tell the old culture what is beginning to happen”. – Marshall McLuhan

Artists, as McLuhan described them, are the Distant Early Warning system of our culture. This exhibition and public performance explores the confluences between technology, poetry, artistic practice, and the influences of McLuhan’s vision in our time.

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On November 8th, as part of the McLuhan 100 conference and DEW Line Festival, join us for an evening of art, poetry and celebration of McLuhan’s vision 100 years later. From Facebook, to the city streets and imaginary glimpses at a new landscape after global warming, artists, poets and new media projects present cultural reflections on the state of the Global Village.

Signals from the DEW Line is a curatorial collaboration by Andrea Thompson and Britt Welter-Nolan.  http://tinyurl.com/6jdxvqx

via McLuhan Galaxy

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The Kingdom of Survival

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THE KINGDOM OF SURVIVAL explores modern skepticism in America, challenges the status quo and uncovers provocative links between survivalist philosophy, ecumenical spirituality, radical political theory, and outlaw culture. The audience is invited into a thoughtful conversation with the likes of Prof. Noam ChomskyDr. Mark Mirabello, Ramsey Kanaan, and the riveting final interview with beloved author, Joe Bageant. These unique thought leaders cast a rare shadow of doubt over our most blindly accepted American traditions. By remaining observantly agnostic to the subjects, the film is able to honestly investigate the physical and psychological practices of diverse individuals in a conflict-ridden and confused post-modern world. In a time of brainwashing corporate and political propaganda, The Kingdom of Survival reunites us with the life-changing spirit of the outlaw highway. 

by M.A. Littler

An interview with Joe Bageant, author of “Deer Hunting with Jesus” and “Rainbow Pie”

Slowboat Films 

Screenings

10/09    RAINDANCE FILM FESTIVAL, London
10/13    BABYLON MITTE, Berlin
10/14 – 10/19 SPUTNIK, Berlin
10/15    MOUSONTURM, Frankfurt
10/18 – 10/19 CASABLANCA, Dresden
10/20 – 10/23 MAL SEH’N KINO, Frankfurt
10/20 – 10/26 FILMHAUS, Saarbrücken
10/24   CINEMA/GLEIS 22, Münster
10/29 – 10/30 CINÉMATTE, Bern

Festivals

2011 Montreal World Film Festival
2011 Raindance Film Festival London
2011 Rappahannock Independent Film Fest

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In the Wave by Walter Russell

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Outsider scientific-mystic Walter Russell developed a lifelong philosophy based on the unifying principles of forces within the cosmos – what seems like a kind of pseudo-scientifically framed offshoot of non-dualism. The most interesting elements his work are the diagrams and charts illustrating his books. They document an idiosyncratic understanding of natural phenomena such as light, magnetism, thermodynamics, waves and vibration.

Esa Ruoho has collected together many illustrations from Russell’s key works in Flickr sets – images from the books The Secret of Light, The Universal One and Atomic Suicide. The ‘In the Wave’ set contains charts with painted colour spectra and elliptical prismatic shapes denoting light waves, electrical vibrations and magnetism.

A strong theme running through Russell’s schematics, especially evident in his ‘Home Study Course’ is the correspondences of geometric equivalences and orders. The charts resemble sets of musical scales, denoting frameworks of periodicity and harmony within particular natural systems. Many of the diagrams, at first glance, might easily be be misinterpreted as modern musical notation…

…It might just be the case that Walter Russell’s genius, and his diagrams, can only be decoded at a later moment in time. His friend Nikola Tesla had advised him to lock away his work in a safe for 1000 years – because humankind was not yet mature enough for it.

Diagrams and paintings by “outsider scientific-mystic” Walter Russell 

via The secret of creation lies in the wave | but does it float + data is nature

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