Tag Archives: poetry

The Shake-Speared Brain: A Theatre of Simultaneous Possibilities

Yes.

Philip Davis pleasures his brain with shifting Shakespearean syntax, measures the results on an electroencephalogram, and finds evidence that powerful writing can literally change the ways in which we think …

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From THE READER

  I have always been very interested in how literature affects us. But I don’t really like it when people say, “This book changed my life!” Struggling with ourselves and our seemingly inextricable mixture of strengths and weaknesses, surely we know that change is much more difficult and much less instant than that. It does scant justice to the deep nature of a life to suppose that a book can simply “change” it. Literature is not a one-off remedy. And actually it is the reading of books itself, amongst other things, that has helped me appreciate that deep complex nature. Nonetheless, I do remain convinced that life without reading and the personal thinking it provokes would be a greatly diminished thing. So, with these varying considerations, I know I need to think harder about what literature does. And here’s another thing. In the last few years I have become interested not only in the contents of the thoughts I read—their meaning for me, their mental and emotional effect—but also in the very shapes these thoughts take; a shape inseparable, I feel, from that content. Moreover, I had a specific intuition—about Shakespeare: that the very shapes of Shakespeare’s lines and sentences somehow had a dramatic effect at deep levels in my mind. For example, Macbeth at the end of his tether:

And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have, but in their stead Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath Which the poor heart would fain deny and dare not.

I’ll say no more than this: it simply would not be the same, would it, if Shakespeare had written it out more straightforwardly: I must not look to have the honour, love, obedience, troops of friends which should accompany old age. Nor would it be the same if he had not suddenly coined that disgusted phrase “mouth-honour” (now a cliché as “lip-service”).

I took this hypothesis—about grammatical or linear shapes and their mapping onto shapes inside the brain—to a scientist, Professor Neil Roberts who heads MARIARC (the Magnetic Resonance and Image Analysis Research Centre) at the University of Liverpool. In particular I mentioned to him the linguistic phenomenon in Shakespeare which is known as “functional shift” or “word class conversion”. It refers to the way that Shakespeare will often use one part of speech—a noun or an adjective, say—to serve as another, often a verb, shifting its grammatical nature with minimal alteration to its shape. Thus in “Lear” for example, Edgar comparing himself to the king: “He childed as I fathered” (nouns shifted to verbs); in “Troilus and Cressida”, “Kingdomed Achilles in commotion rages” (noun converted to adjective); “Othello”, “To lip a wanton in a secure couch/And to suppose her chaste!”‘ (noun “lip” to verb; adjective “wanton” to noun). The effect is often electric I think, like a lightning-flash in the mind: for this is an economically compressed form of speech, as from an age when the language was at its most dynamically fluid and formatively mobile; an age in which a word could move quickly from one sense to another, in keeping with Shakespeare’s lightning-fast capacity for forging metaphor. It was a small example of sudden change of shape, of concomitant effect upon the brain. Could we make an experiment out of it? We decided to try to see what happens inside us when the brain comes upon sentences like “The dancers foot it with grace”, or “We waited for disclose of news”, or “Strong wines thick my thoughts”, or “I could out-tongue your griefs” or “Fall down and knee/The way into his mercy”. For research suggests that there is one specific part of the brain that processes nouns and another part that processes verbs: but what happens when for a micro-second there is a serious hesitation between whether, in context, this is noun or verb? The main cognitive research done so far on the confusion of verbs and nouns has been to do with mistakes made by those who are brain-damaged and thus on the possible neural correlates of grammatical errors and semantic violations. Hardly anybody appears to have investigated the neural processing of a ‘positive error’ such as functional shift in normal healthy organisms. This truly would be a small instance of inner drama. We decided to experiment using three pieces of kit. First, EEG (electroencephalogram) tests, with electrodes placed on different parts of the scalp to measure brain-events taking place in time; then MEG (magnetoencephalograhy), a helmet-like brain-scanner which measures effects in terms of location in the brain as well as their timing; and finally fMRI (Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging), those tunnel-like brain-scanners which focus even more specifically on brain-activation by location. I knew nothing much of this: I am indebted to Professor Roberts and to Dr Guillaume Thierry of Bangor University who joined us in the enterprise. With the help of my colleague in English language Victorina Gonzalez-Diaz, as well as the scientists, I designed a set of stimuli—40 examples of Shakespeare’s functional shift. At this very early and rather primitive stage, we could not give our student-subjects undiluted lines of Shakespeare because too much in the brain would light up in too many places: that is one of the definitions of what Shakespeare-language does. So, the stimuli we created were simply to do with the noun-to-verb or verb-to-noun shift-words themselves, with more ordinary language around them. It is not Shakespeare taken neat; it is just based on Shakespeare, with water. But around each of those sentences of functional shift we also provided three counter-examples which were shown on screen to the experiment’s subjects in random order: all they had to do was press a button saying whether the sentence roughly made sense or not. Thus, below, A (“accompany”) is a sentence which is conventionally grammatical, makes simple sense, and acts as a control; B (“charcoal”) is grammatically odd, like a functional shift, but it makes no semantic sense in context; C (“incubate”) is grammatically correct but still semantically does not make sense; D (“companion”) is a Shakespearian functional shift from noun to verb, and is grammatically odd but does make sense:


A) I was not supposed to go there alone: you said you would accompany me. B) I was not supposed to go there alone: you said you would charcoal me. C) I was not supposed to go there alone: you said you would incubate me. D) I was not supposed to go there alone: you said you would companion me.


What happened to our subjects’ brains when they read the critical words on screen in front of them? So far we have just carried out the EEG stage of experimentation under Dr Thierry at Bangor. EEG works as follows in its graph-like measurements. When the brain senses a semantic violation, it automatically registers what is called an N400 effect, a negative wave modulation 400 milliseconds after the onset of the critical word that disrupts the meaning of a sentence. The N400 amplitude is small when little semantic integration effort is needed (e.g., to integrate the word “eat” in the sentence, “The pizza was too hot to eat”), and large when the critical word is unexpected and therefore difficult to integrate (e.g., “The pizza was too hot to sing”). But when the brain senses a syntactic violation there is a P600 effect, a parietal modulation peaking approximately 600 milliseconds after the onset of the word that upsets syntactic integrity. Thus, when a word violates the grammatical structure of a sentence (e.g., “The pizza was too hot to mouth”), a positive going wave is systematically observed. Preliminary results suggest this:


(A) With the simple control sentence (“You said you would accompany me”), NO N400 or P600 effect because it is correct both semantically and syntactically. (B) With “You said you would charcoal me”, BOTH N400 and P600 highs, because it violates both grammar and meaning. (C) With “You said you would incubate me”, NO P600 (it makes grammatical sense) but HIGH N400 (it does not make semantic sense). (D) With the Shakespearian “You said you would companion me”, HIGH P600 (because it feels like a grammatical anomaly) but NO N400 (the brain will tolerate it, almost straightaway, as making sense despite the grammatical difficulty). This is in marked contrast with B above.


So what? First, it was as Guillaume Thierry had predicted. It meant that “functional shift” was a robust phenomenon: that is to say, it had a distinct and unique effect on the brain. Instinctively Shakespeare was right to use it as one of his dramatic tools. Second the P600 surge means the brain was thus primed to look out for more difficulty, to work at a higher level, whilst still accepting that fundamental sense was being made. In other words, while the Shakespearian functional shift was semantically integrated with ease, it triggered a syntactic re-evaluation process likely to raise attention and give more weight to the sentence as a whole. Shakespeare is stretching us; he is opening up the possibility of further peaks, new potential pathways or developments. Our findings show how Shakespeare created dramatic effects by implicitly taking advantage of the relative independence—at the neural level—of semantics and syntax in sentence comprehension. It is as though he is a pianist using one hand to keep the background melody going, whilst simultaneously the other pushes towards ever more complex variations and syncopations. This is a small beginning. But it has some importance in the development of inter-disciplinary studies—the co-operation of arts and sciences in the study of the mind, the brain, and the neural inner processing of language felt as an experience of excitement, never fully explained or exhausted by subsequent explanation or conceptualization. It is that neural excitement that gets to me: those peaks of sudden pre-conscious understanding coming into consciousness itself; those possibilities of shaking ourselves up at deep, momentary levels of being. This, then, is a chance to map something of what Shakespeare does to mind at the level of brain, to catch the flash of lightning that makes for thinking. For my guess, more broadly, remains this: that Shakespeare’s syntax, its shifts and movements, can lock into the existing pathways of the brain and actually move and change them—away from old and aging mental habits and easy long-established sequences. It could be that Shakespeare’s use of language gets so far into our brains that he shifts and new-creates pathways—not unlike the establishment of new biological networks using novel combinations of existing elements (genes/proteins in biology: units of phonology, semantics, syntax , and morphology in language). Then indeed we might be able to see something of the ways literature can cause affect or create change, without resorting to being assertively gushy. I do not think this is reductive. Cognitive science is often to do with the discovery of the precise localization of functions. But suppose that instead we can show the following by neuro-imaging: that for all the localization of noun-processing in one place and the localization of verb-processing in another, when the brain is asked to work at more complex meanings, the localization gives way to the movement between the two static locations. Then the brain is working at a higher level of evolution, at an emergent consciousness paradoxically undetermined by the structures it still works from. And then we might be re-discovering at a demonstrable neural level the experience not merely of specialist “art” but of thinking itself going on not in static terms but in dynamic ones. At present there is of course no brain imaging system that allows the study of continuous thought. But the hope is that, within experimental limitations, we might be able to gain a glimpse within ourselves of a changing neurological configuration of the brain, like the shape of the syntax just ahead of the realization of the semantics. In that case Shakespeare’s art would be no more and no less than the supreme example of a mobile, creative and adaptive human capacity, in deep relation between brain and language. It makes new combinations, creates new networks, with changed circuitry and added levels, layers and overlaps. And all the time it works like the cry of “action” on a film-set, by sudden peaks of activity and excitement dramatically breaking through into consciousness. It makes for what William James said of mind in his “Principles of Psychology”, “a theatre of simultaneous possibilities”. This could be a new beginning to thinking about reading and mental changes.

(Philip Davis is editor of The Reader magazine, and teaches in the School of English at the University of Liverpool. This article first appeared in The Reader, Number 23, pp. 39-43, and was prepared in collaboration with Neil Roberts, Victorina Gonzalez-Diaz, and Guillaume Thierry.)

Hat tip: Arts & Letters Daily

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Poet, painter, singer, dreamer: Billy Childish

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Beautiful David Lynch

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July 21, 2012

Adam Bordow | AT HIS PEAK | David Lynch

THOUGH HE’S OFTEN assumed to be as peculiar as the creepy characters his movies feature, in person director David Lynch seems to have less in common with the Pabst-swilling sadist Frank Booth in “Blue Velvet,” and more with do-gooder Special Agent Dale Cooper, portrayed by Kyle MacLachlan in “Twin Peaks.”

For starters, despite his proclivity for the outer limits, there’s no place like home for the Missoula, Mont.-born maker of such profane films as “Mulholland Drive” and “Lost Highway” and humane ones as “The Straight Story” and “The Elephant Man.”

“What I really like is to be at home, working,” he said one recent sundown from the penthouse suite of the Chateau Marmont hotel in Los Angeles, near the residence he shares with his

The homebody element had been evident the evening before at Hollywood’s labyrinthine Milk Studios. Guests were feting the 66-year-old filmmaker and painter for the debut of his collaboration with Dom Pérignon—he designed a signature look for a limited-edition run of vintage bottles. Mr. Lynch looked like a deer in the headlights, his grayish-blue eyes wary below his camera-friendly pompadour.

Even though 2001’s “Mulholland Drive” stuck a star on then-newbie Naomi Watts’s forehead, and earned Mr. Lynch his third Oscar nomination for best director, he has made only one feature-length movie since: 2006’s “Inland Empire.” In the meantime, he has focused on other passions—of which there are many.

Mr. Lynch embraced transcendental meditation around the time he made the 1977 curiosity “Eraserhead,” and since 2005 has headed the David Lynch Foundation, a charity he created to fund the teaching of T.M. in schools. It’s become a consuming mission.

He also has written a self-help memoir, “Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness, and Creativity”; conceptualized and designed furnishings for a Paris nightclub-arts space called Silencio (named after the fright-house theater in “Mulholland Drive”); and released a solo CD, entitled “Crazy Clown Time.” He and his wife are expecting a baby, who will be his fourth

Colleague Mel Brooks once called him “Jimmy Stewart from Mars.” But despite his dark reputation, the former Eagle Scout is sincere, folksy and ha-ha funny. He uses the word “beautiful” to describe nearly everything.

~.~

The greatest thing my father left me was a love for cutting wood, my love for sawing, especially

The most delicious food is far and away super-crisp, almost snapping-crisp bacon with two scrambled eggs, toasted hash browns, white toast with butter and jam, and coffee.

I have a coffee brand. But I’m not a businessman and I think my line of coffee will die the death this year. It’s very hard to make a profit.

I have deep love for my Swatch watch.

I can’t live without coffee, transcendental meditation, American Spirit cigarettes, a freedom to create ideas that flow and my sweet wife, Emily. And this business of just being able to work and think: It’s really, really beautiful.

You don’t need a special place to meditate. You can transcend anywhere in the world. The unified field is here, and there, and everywhere. Maybe if you sat on a bed of nails to do it…no, not so much comfort. Find a comfy chair, though, close your eyes and away you go!

I don’t paint the town red. But when I do go out, people always want to touch my hair. It happens

I first started buttoning my shirt [all the way to the top] because, for some reason, my collarbone is very sensitive. And I don’t like to feel wind on my

The best cities of all are Los Angeles and Paris. They’re where I feel most comfortable.

Martino/Vintage Los Angeles The Fish Shanty

I used to deliver The Wall Street Journal in Los Angeles. I did it to support myself while making “Eraserhead.” I’d pick up my papers at 11:30 at night. I had throws that were particularly fantastic. There was one where I’d release the paper, which would soar with the speed of the car and slam into the front door of this building, triggering its lobby lights—a fantastic experience. Another one I called “The Big Whale.” There was a place, the Fish Shanty, on La Cienega. A big whale’s mouth was the front door you entered through. I’d throw a block before it, and hit the paper directly into the mouth.

Martin Ramin for The Wall Street Journal (wine) From left: a Swatch watch, Mr. Lynch’s book and one of his designs for Dom Pérignon

One designer I love is [the late] Raymond Loewy. He redesigned the Coca-Cola bottle that stuck, designed the 1963 Avanti Studebaker…and his locomotives were incredibly beautiful.

I am currently working on some paintings and music. I am also trying to catch ideas for my next feature film. But I haven’t caught the right ones

My advice to finger-painters would be to go with your intuition: it’s action and reaction. I paint with my fingers quite a bit. A brush will do a certain thing…but your finger will do a different thing.

Collection An ‘Eraserhead’ poster

I recently collected a toy telephone. It’s from the 1940s and made of metal.

People say my films are dark. But like lightness, darkness stems from a reflection of the world. The thing is, I get these ideas that I truly fall in love with. And a good movie idea is often like a girl you’re in love with, but you know she’s not the kind of girl you bring home to your parents, because they sometimes hold some dark and troubling things.

Edited from an interview by Steve Garbarino

via The Wall Street Journal

http://on.wsj.com/Qdgh2A

Thank ya, Mark Parker + Roger Ebert @ebertchicago

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The Allen Ginsberg Project: Ginsberg Recordings

[Allen Ginsberg, San Francisco Civic Center Peace Rally, April 1971 photo c John Bonny]

A major announcement today – the formation of Ginsberg Recordings (a collaborative partnership between The Allen Ginsberg Estate and the Esther Creative Group (the management company of Lou Reed, The Gaslight Anthem and Bryan Ferry, amongst others). Ginsberg Recordings is a project aimed at releasing all of Allen’s work (both previously released and unreleased) under one single umbrella. The goal of this project is to create and distribute (and maintain) a fully comprehensive digital library of the recorded work. Ancillary to this is the intention to, subsequently, eventually, release further re-issues in other formats. As ECG has noted “A significant amount of Ginsberg’s commercially-released material was issued on vinyl, cassette, and CD’s – thus the need to up-date it into the digital world”. Ginsberg Recordings intends “to collect long-lost recordings, scattered around the world on small, defunct, and/or obscure labels (as well as major labels that have simply let the Allen Ginsberg material fall out-of-print)”. It is, itself, (will be) a record-label, and looks, through co-ordination and centralization, to by-pass potential multiple copyright and legal difficulties, as well as make for a “faster turn-around for the release and licensing/publishing of all of Ginsberg’s poetry and music recordings”. The repository of materials (so far un-mined) currently in the archives at Stanford, is, as they point out, “a trove of buried gems” – Ginsberg Recordings intends to (alongside releasing previously-released work) “dig deeper into uncovering completely unreleased material and more personal recordings”.

But first – the initial Ginsberg Recordings release – this will be a re-release of the 1994 four-CD box-set anthology Holy Soul Jelly Roll-Poems And Songs 1949-1993 (compiled by Allen when he was alive, and produced, originally, for the Rhino Word-Beat label, by producer Hal Willner). This new edition, you’ll be pleased to hear, will retain the original liner-notes, introductions and images so cherished in the box-set – but will now be conveniently digital. As Willner himself wrote in those liner notes, “limiting the wealth of material down to four CD’s was one of the hardest things that I’ve ever had to do…this box-set is only the beginning of what should be released on Allen”. We look forward to a fitting dissemination of Allen’s achievement. We look forward to an exciting and fruitful collaboration.

http://ginsbergblog.blogspot.com/2012/07/ginsberg-recordings.html?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews&m=1

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Still Silver: Diode + Poet Rick Holland featuring Chris James

The second single release from Diode and Rick Holland’s collaborative project featuring the vocals of Stateless front man Chris James. Out on WW Music.

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Rick Holland | Diode 

Photographs by Charlie Campbell

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On the Road to Premiere at Cannes Film Festival

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‘On The Road’ adaptation to play at 65th Cannes Film Festival

 

The highly anticipated first film adaptation of the Jack Kerouac classic, On The Road, is to get its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. Starring a roster of famous names, including Lord Of The Rings star Viggo Mortensen, Twilight actress Kristen Stewart and Sam Riley, star of the Joy Division biopic Control, On The Road is directed by Walter Salles, most famous for bringing the Che Guevara story The Motorcycle Diaries to the screen. 

 

via NME

 

On the Road (film) Wiki 

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Official Cannes

 

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Darcie Dennigan, The Job Interview

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Darcie Dennigan, ‘The Job Interview from _Madame X_

via Paula Mendoza-Hanna

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It was psychological warfare and poetry warfare. Their art was ridicule.

1980

 

“The more illusion there is, the greater the opportunity for enlightenment.”

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