Tag Archives: sculpture

ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG at Gagosian Gallery

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Takashi Murakami at Gagosian Gallery, Britannia Street

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Wholeo Dome

“Artist Carol Geary, aka Caroling, conceived, built, and completed this incredible stained glass dome, entitled Wholeo Dome (pronounced “Holy O”), in 1974. When creating the piece, Caroling said, “I wanted not to look at a window, but to be in a window.” So, many trials and shattered pieces of glass later, the 14-foot wide, 7-foot tall dome was constructed.

According to the artist’s website, it is “a hemisphere made of leaded glass panels supported by a geodesic aluminum frame. The antique handblown glass pieces have sometimes been stained, painted, and fired in a kiln or etched in acid to reveal layered colors. The glass is put together with strips of lead to form panels of various shapes and sizes. The average panel is three feet across.”

Now, after more than twenty years in storage, the complicated and beautiful structure has been installed and made accessible for visitors at The Farm School in Summertown, Tennessee. Guests can enter the sculpture and surround themselves with the vibrations of colorful light that stream in through the stained glass.”

via http://mymodernmet.com

http://www.wholeo.net/wholeodome.htm

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Martha Friedman

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“Melons,” 2005; Cast urethane foam and acrylic paint; 48 x 53 3/4 x 53 3/4 inches.

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“Ladies Room,” 2010; Silicone rubber and fiberglas reinforced FGR; 108 x 18 x 12 inches.

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Process photo of Tongue Flap, 2010.

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“Nails,” 2005; Cast aluminum; 38 x 38 x 38 inches.

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“Waffle,” foam, urethane resin, aluminum, paint, 85 x 78 inches, 2008.

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“Waffle,” close-up.

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“Laid,” 2010; Cast silicon rubber and concrete base, 8 x 3 x 2 feet.

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“Laid,” 2010.

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Petrified Waffle I 2009. Wood, formica, marble, 39 ½ x 15 ½ x 15 1/2 inches.

WALLSPACE Gallery

Martha Friedman

via d’arte board + madprime + hyperallergic

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Jeju Love Land, Erotic Sculpture Park in South Korea

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Jeju Love Land is an erotic sculpture park located in South Korea’s Jeju Island. With over 140 sex-themed sculptures, it is well established as a major destination for visitors, especially honeymooners.

The Museum of Sex and Health is also located on Jeju Island.

The park is focused on a theme of sex, running sex education films, and featuring 140 sculptures representing humans in various sexual positions. It also has other elements such as large phallus statues, stone labia, and hands-on exhibits such as a “masturbation-cycle.”

Photos by Michael SotnikovBrent Pitre and Zane Hickman

Thanks to Molly McCloskey + Laughing Squid

 

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Dev Harlan

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Dev Harlan – “Parmenides I”, 2011
Foam, wood, plaster, video projection
Dimensions approx 8′ diameter

Light sculpture at Christopher Henry Gallery, NY. Presented as part of Dev Harlan’s solo exhibition “The Astral Flight Hangar”

Videographer: Dustin Cohen
Audio: USMILEAMBIENT by Shamantis

via Laughing Squid

 

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Mound by Allison Schulnik

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Please allow 1 minute to load before viewing.

Credits:


Film by Allison Schulnik


Cinematography by Helder K. Sun.


“It’s Raining Today” written by Noel Scott Engel

4:23 min
Copyright Allison Schulnik 2011
allisonschulnik.com 

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Dorothea Tanning

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Dorothea Tanning, painter and poet

Evening

He told us, with the years, you will come
To love the world.
And we sat there with our souls in our laps,
And comforted them.

Dorothea Tanning

Tanning is that rare being who embodies gifts in the poetic domain as well as the visual. A woman with a long history in the American art world of the 20th century, Tanning began branching out into other forms of expression later in life.

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Dorothea Tanning and Max Ernst (they were married in 1946)

 

Dorothea Tanning

 

A bit of background about Tanning, from Poets.org:

“It’s hard to be always the same person,” reads the epigraph for A Table of Content, Dorothea Tanning’s first book of poems, published in 2004. After half a century of acclaimed drawing, painting, sculpture, collage, and set and costume design—with pieces in major museum collections, including the Tate Gallery, London; the Centre Pompidou and the Musée de la Ville de Paris, both in Paris; the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Chicago Art Institute, among others—Tanning turned her eye (and ear) to poetry, reinventing herself after retiring from visual mediums.

As W. S. Merwin put it: “She goes out of the room, comes back, and she’s someone else—and after a few hours I think, Phew, that’ll do for a while!” Tanning has long been known as a friend of poets, and her public shift toward poetry may very well have been due to years of private collaborations and intimacies.

Another Language of Flowers, a book published in 1998 documenting Tanning’s last paintings, what she calls her “foray into imaginative botany,” can be seen as another of the artist’s points of transformation. Tanning believed that she was finished with painting until she discovered a collection of blank and very valuable Lefebvre-Foinet canvases she’d bought in Paris twenty years earlier.

Determined to use the fine canvases, Tanning spent almost a year—between June, 1997 and April, 1998—sketching and completing twelve large paintings of imaginary flowers. Those paintings, and her preperatory sketches, are reproduced in the book, with each image given a fictional name—such as “Victrola floribunda”—and accompanied by a poem. James Merrill, who had been a kind of mentor to Tanning and had died three years before she began the flowers series, provides the lines for the first image: “A wish. Come true? Here’s where to learn.” John Ashbery, Richard Howard, J. D. McClatchy, Anthony Hecht, Adrienne Rich, and others also give voices to the flowers.

Within a year of completing her flowers series, Tanning, at eighty-nine, began publishing her own poems, and within another year was being recognized for poems in Poetry, Parnassus, The Paris Review, The New Yorker, Plougshares, and others. Now, with a full collection of startling and perceptive poetry, which C. D. Wright has called “a meal not to be late for,” Tanning has fully transformed her career and earned her a place among American poets.

 

via Slow Muse + Spaightwood Galleries

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