Tag Archives: typography

Sam Winston for the New York Times magazine

Newyorktimesmagazine2
Newyorktimesmagazine1
Newyorktimesmagazine3

via Lost at E Minor + Sam Winston

Advertisements
Tagged , , ,

Bill Hicks – It’s Just a Ride (Kinetic Typography)

Tagged , , , , , , ,

netpoetic > unicode

shows all displayable characters in the unicode range 0 – 65536 (49571 characters). one character per frame. 

http://joerg.piringer.net/unicode/

if you want to know more about the video & the sound go here:
http://netpoetic.com/2011/04/unicode/

Joerg Piringer

Tagged , , , ,

Short story poster by Klas Ernflo

Media_http25mediatumb_kgxbd

Short story poster 70×100 cm. by Klas Ernflo

http://www.klasherbert.com/

Written by Jess Row.

Work in progress, soon to be printed.

Tagged , , ,

Incredible

Media_http26mediatumb_difny

via Ruradelia | Rural is the Future.

Tagged , , ,

Fry on Language

Do they ever let the tripping of the tips of their tongues against the tops of their teeth transport them to giddy euphoric bliss?

For a brief time in 2008, Stephen Fry, the popular British author, writer and comedian, produced a series of podcasts – called “Podgrams” – that drew on his writings, speeches and collective thoughts. (Find them on RSSand iTunes here). During one particular episode, Fry meditated on language (the English language & his own language) and a little on Barthes, Chomsky, Pinker and even Eddie Izzard. Then Matthew Rogers took that meditation and ran with it, producing a “kinetic typography animation” that artfully illustrates a six minute segment of the longer talk. Watch it above, and if you’re captivated by what Fry has to say, don’t miss his popular video, What I Wish I Had Known When I Was 18.

via Open Culture 

Tagged , , , ,

Bob and Roberta Smith

Bob-and-roberta-smith-fring

Artist Patrick Brill better known as Bob and Roberta Smith, currently lives and works in London. He is known for artwork that incorporates text…

via artdaily.org

Bobsmith2

Bob-and-roberta-smith-im-in-charge-1024x682
2008_1217test0056
Bob-and-roberta-smith-1
Img_9853
8642_medium
08
Thedirectorofmoma_2008_signwriterspaintonboard_86x80cm
Artists_ruin_it_for_everyone_by_bob_roberta_smith
Img_1040
06
2267289100_2a391c5792
Bob-1

Bob and Roberta Smith 

Photos via JudyGr, Catfunt 

Tagged , , , ,

Evolution of Type

Bfe43ebeeb00c02b952e31ce97d0ec7e

“Of all the achievements of the human mind, the birth of the alphabet is the most momentous. Letters, like men, have now an ancestry, and the ancestry of words, as of men, is often a very noble possession, making them capable of great things. indeed, it has been said that the invention of writing is more important than all the victories ever won or constitutions devised by man. The history of writing is, in a way, the history of the human race, since in it are bound up, severally and together, the development of thought, of expression, of art, of intercommunication, and of mechanical invention.(…) A letter should possess an esthetic quality that is organic, an essential of the form itself and not the result of mere additions to its fundamental form nor to meaningless variations of it.”

Frederic W. Goudy´s “The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering” (1918) 

by Andreas Scheiger

via quipsologies

Tagged , , , , , ,

The Rural Studio: Proceed And Be Bold!

Media_httpfarm1static_gopxk

Rural Studio, Samuel ‘Sambo’ Mockbee

“Proceed and Be Bold!” is a catchphrase used by the incredibly talented Samuel “Sambo” Mockbee, cofounder of Auburn’s Rural Studio (and winner in 2000 of a MacArthur ‘genius’ grant, among other awards).

The Rural Studio was developed within the Auburn School of Architecture with intent to get students out of the classroom and in to hands-on experience with members of a community that would actually be utilizing their work. In the past, the students’ hands-on experience consisted of them building temporary works…a beam or truss, which would later be torn down. D.K. Ruth, who hired Mockbee at Auburn, discussed with Mockbee that one could take such materials and (rather than a temporary exercise) they could “build something substantial”. The idea for Rural Studio was less pre-conceived notions of what architecture is – be it for glass skyscrapers or McMansions – and more a noble architecture of decency for poor people – beautiful whether built with carpet squares, car windshields, or tires. Mockbee died December 30, 2001 but left behind were stunning, noble works for people in one of the poorest areas in the country.

The Rural Studio is still going strong.

http://www.ruralstudio.com/

via deep fried kudzu (ginger):
http://www.flickr.com/photos/deepfriedkudzu/

Tagged , , , , ,