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Stanley Green

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Stanley Green 

 Stanley Owen Green (22 February 1915 – 4 December 1993), known as the Protein Man, was a human billboard who became a well-known figure in London, England, during the latter half of the 20th century.

For 25 years, Green patrolled Oxford Street in the West End, carrying a placard that advocated “Less Lust, By Less Protein: Meat Fish Bird; Egg Cheese; Peas Beans; Nuts. And Sitting,” though the wording—and punctuation—changed slightly over the years. Arguing that protein made people lustful and aggressive, his solution was “protein wisdom,” a low-protein diet for “better, kinder, happier people.” For a few pence, passers-by could purchase his 14-page pamphlet, Eight Passion Proteins with Care, which reportedly sold 87,000 copies over 20 years, its front cover observing, “This booklet would benefit more, if it were read occasionally.”

Green became one of London’s much-loved eccentrics, though his campaign to suppress desire, as one commentator put it, was not invariably popular, leading as it did to two arrests for obstruction and the need to wear green overalls to protect himself from spit. He nevertheless took great delight in his local fame

Photos via Nad + Norman Craig 

 

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Jaume Plensa Poetry Key at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

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Jaume Plensa at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

Extended until January 22, 2012

via YSPSPREAD | Art Culture

Previous posts featuring Jaume Plensa

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Francis Picabia – The Cacodylic Eye (L’Oeil cacodylate)

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Francis Picabia (French, 1879-1953)

The Cacodylic Eye (L’Oeil cacodylate), 1921

Oil with photomontage and collage on canvas, Centre Pompidou

via Escape into Life + bildwerk

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Unwinding Reel: Ken Kesey’s First Trip

Ken Kesey’s First LSD Trip Animated | Open Culture


Back in 1959, Ken Kesey, then a grad student in Stanford’s creative writing program, started participating in government-sponsored medical research that tested a range of hallucinogens — LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, and the rest. As part of the research project, Kesey spoke into a tape recorder and recounted the ins-and-outs of his hallucinations. These tapes were eventually stored away, and Kesey went on to write One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, a book that now sits on TIME’s list of the 100 Best English-Language Novels since 1923.

A half century later (and ten years after Kesey’s own death), the LSD tapes live again. This week, the filmmaker Alex Gibney will release Magic Tripa new documentary that revisits Kesey’s fabled road trip across America with the Merry Pranksters and their psychedelic “Further” bus. (Tom Wolfe, you might recall, famously covered this trip with The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, published in 1968.) Taken from the new film, the sequence above mixes the rediscovered tapes with some artful animation, and it captures the whole mood of Kesey’s first trip …

via Open Culture

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Babelcast: Critical Intelligence Gap

Babel

The babelcast-mosaic is an algorithmic, computer-generated podcast series created from fragmented and distorted sounds of U.S. and World leaders. Juxtaposed and mixed with dynamic noise textures, the resulting ambient soundscape offers a unique musical perspective on mass media, language, and current events. This enhanced version adds algorithmically selected and manipulated still images. Each edition is built exclusively from sounds and images harvested within a defined period of days.

by Christopher Ariza 

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Critical Gap In In telligence:  

It depends on what your definition of Isis...

Marduk, Murdak, Murdoch

Etemenanki (Sumerian: “temple of the foundation of heaven and earth”) was the name of a ziggurat dedicated to Marduk in the city of Babylon. It was famously rebuilt by the 6th century BC Neo-Babylonian dynasty rulers Nabopolassar and Nebuchadnezzar II. According to modern scholars such as Stephen L. Harris, the biblical story of the Tower of Babel was likely influenced by Etemenanki during the Babylonian captivity of the Hebrews.

Nebuchadnezzar wrote that the original tower had been built in antiquity: “A former king built the Temple of the Seven Lights of the Earth, but he did not complete its head. Since a remote time, people had abandoned it, without order expressing their words. Since that time earthquakes and lightning had dispersed its sun-dried clay; the bricks of the casing had split, and the earth of the interior had been scattered in heaps.”

The Greek historian Herodotus (440 BC) later wrote of this ziggurat, which he called the “Temple of Zeus Belus”, giving an account of its vast dimensions.

The already decayed Great Ziggurat of Babylon was finally destroyed by Alexander the Great in an attempt to rebuild it. He managed to move the tiles of the tower to another location, but his death stopped the reconstruction. Since then only the base remains, but it is visible from Google Earth, which places its location at 32.5362583°N 44.4208252°E just south of Baghdad.

 

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