Tag Archives: texas

Texas Town Converts Abandoned Walmart into Award-Winning Public Library

Xlarge

Texas Town Converts Abandoned Walmart into Award-Winning Public Library

By Neetzan Zimmerman

After Walmart closed up shop in McAllen, they left 124,500 square feet of retail space behind for use by the city.

Rather than bring in another big box corporation to pick up where Walmart left off, the southern Texas city decided to turn the building into its new public library. And not just any public library neither: Upon its completion, the McAllen Public Library became the largest single-story library in the United States.

The project was massively successful: Registration by first-time patrons went up by 23% in the library’s first month of operation, and its “functional, flexible and affordable” interior — constructed by Minneapolis-based Meyer, Scherer & Rockcastle, Ltd. — was recently named winner of the International Interior Design Association’s 2012 Library Interior Design Competition.

“In a city like McAllen, with cartel violence across the river (less than 10 miles away from the library), I think it’s amazing that the city is devoting resources to a) not only saving a large and conspicuous piece of property from decline and vandalism, but b) diverting those resources into youth and the public trust,” McAllen native Adriana Ramirez told the LA Times.

[TM Daily Post via Mother Jones, photo by Lara Swimmer via PSFK]

http://gawker.com/5923608/texas-town-converts-abandoned-walmart-into-award+winning-public-library?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=pulsenews

Advertisements
Tagged , , , ,

Got Me Under Pressure

Photos via ex.libris, nyyno21, and tonbabydc

ZZ Top 

@discogs

Tagged , , ,

Poet Anne Waldman and Jack Kerouac’s America

Poet Anne Waldman

April 18, 2008

via Harry Ransom Center, humanities research library and museum, UT Austin

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/

 

Jack Kerouac’s America by Douglas Brinkley

April 24, 2008

via Harry Ransom Center, humanities research library and museum, UT Austin

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/

 

 

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Texas Panhandle

Media_httpfarm3static_meenf

by Michael Hughes

September 2003

Texas Panhandle. Fort Worth- Amarillo

Fort Worth Cattle Yard District

Tagged , , , ,

Buddy Holly and the Crickets

The Real Buddy Holly Story – The complete video biography of rock ‘n’ roll legend Buddy Holly, produced and hosted by Paul McCartney. This entertaining and enlightening show is the most definitive biography of Buddy Holly ever assembled, featuring interviews with members of The Crickets and many of Buddy Holly’s family and friends who knew him best. Includes rare performances and Paul McCartney performs several of Buddy Holly’s songs.

Part 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

 

Buddy Holly and the Crickets made an appearance on the Arthur Murray Dance Party on December 29, 1957. It was unusual to see a band like the Crickets performing on the show. This video includes the complete introduction by Kathryn Murray. Another interesting note…this footage is used on Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand” compilations. Clark claims that the footage of the only appearance that Holly and the Crickets made on Bandstand in the fall of 1958 was destroyed in the 70s. They performed “Heartbeat”. It’s a shame that the footage was destroyed because it was Buddy’s last appearance on TV before his death.

 

This beautiful song was co-written by Buddy Holly and Norman Petty and recorded with the Ray Ellis orchestra on October 21, 1958, at the Pythian Temple Studio in New York City. It was not released until March 1960, after Buddy Hollys tragic death, when it was included on the album, The Buddy Holly Story, Vol. 2, on the Coral label. The personnel on the track are : Buddy Holly: vocal; Al Caiola: guitar; Sanford Bloch: bass; Ernest Hayes: piano; Abraham “Boomie” Richman: tenor saxophone; Clifford Leeman: drums; Doris Johnson: harp; Sylvan Shulman, Leo Kruczek, Leonard Posner, Irving Spice, Ray Free, Herbert Bourne, Julius Held & Paul Winter: violins; David Schwartz & Howard Kay: violas; Maurice Brown; Maurice Bialkin: cellos. Though the sax solo is credited to Boomie Richman, some sources credit it to Sam The Man Taylor.

 

Buddy Holly recorded this Demo (the fast version) in his New Yorker Apartment in January 1959, weeks before his death, as a demo. It was overdubbed in 1968 and released the next year on the GIANT LP.

 

Buddy Holly

 

Buddy Holly Archives 

 

Buddy Holly Center      

Tagged , , , ,